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The Greeks and story telling and great Greek myth
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Talking Horse
 01 Jun 2014, 16:17 #180062 Reply To Post
Anyone here well up on Greek myth and the like?
I’ve got as far as an underworld character who occupies the underworld, Tantulus. This character, son of Zeus, dines with the Gods but pilfers some of the nectar and ambrosia and is punished. The punishment in the underworld is he’s left in is ample food and drink but he cannot reach any of it and dies in fear and starvation.
Now the ‘problem’ is I’m working on something this while or an idea is there in my head of a protagonist/main character/’hero’ is a sort of ‘anti-Tantulus’. My character has got everything in a sense, tick the boxes yourself: the job, the house, the family life, the car but he wants out; even in where it provides security, this character has it all and can simply reach out like Tantalus for the paycheque, which he can reach and get; Tantalus cant reach the food. But my character would be happier out of it all again.
Am I making sense here? My character in staging a Greek tragedy would be one who is seduced by it all and in a modern backdrop wants ‘out’ despite having it all........... Bear in mind one Mr Joyce did it; and model his one big book on that Greek hero – he doing it over one day plus in one city.
Does such a character exist in Greek myth? Who gets seduced by it all; be material wealth and so on but is happier getting out of it all again? Once (s)he has attained a position of wealth and privilege.
I’m finding it difficult it sift all through Greek mythology you see.
Answers and replies welcome.
SPARTAN242
 02 Jun 2014, 11:49 #180072 Reply To Post
I'm not sure I know anyone in Greek myth, obviously there is King Midas but that is different.

I would say your closest is something like Buddha... he was a prince, a rich man, had everything and then gave up everything to reach enlightenment.

you can always make it more Greek by having the gods become envious of his wisdom and his lack of 'gratefulness ' for not being content with everything the gods have already given him.

make any sense? Ignore otherwise!
AlyssaRose
 02 Jun 2014, 17:29 #180077 Reply To Post
Along these lines, you could also consider Crates of Thebes. Not myth, but he gave up wealth for a life of poverty.
"I'm just going to write because I cannot help it."
- Charlotte Bronte

AlyssaRose
 02 Jun 2014, 19:58 #180079 Reply To Post
Quote: AlyssaRose, Monday, 2 Jun 2014 17:29
Along these lines, you could also consider Crates of Thebes. Not myth, but he gave up wealth for a life of poverty.


I forgot to say, it is thought that Crates was moved by the tragedy of Telephus. It could fit in with your storyline.
"I'm just going to write because I cannot help it."
- Charlotte Bronte

Talking Horse
 03 Jun 2014, 14:36 #180085 Reply To Post
Spartan: am slightly confused.
The pronoun 'his'.
Are you referring to Buddha there and 'his'


Thanks for answers & contributions and I've a bit to research now.
Talking Horse
 03 Jun 2014, 19:02 #180089 Reply To Post
Quote: SPARTAN242, Monday, 2 Jun 2014 11:49
I'm not sure I know anyone in Greek myth, obviously there is King Midas but that is different.

I would say your closest is something like Buddha... he was a prince, a rich man, had everything and then gave up everything to reach enlightenment.

you can always make it more Greek by having the gods become envious of his wisdom and his lack of 'gratefulness ' for not being content with everything the gods have already given him.

make any sense? Ignore otherwise!



You state: 'You can always make it more Greek by having the gods become envious of his wisdom....'
Whose wisdom? Buddha's?
Surely these gods themselves are possessed of infinite wisdom themselves..... why would they be 'jealous'?


Meanwhile I'm busy on research. Most of the figures quoted dont really fill the bill -yet anyway.

A chappie I knew many years ago from school, a real Billy Bunter 'swot' type, went off to, in someone's words, to Oxford to 'read the classics....' Must look him up & give him a bell.

gyjcg
 03 Jun 2014, 22:25 #180091 Reply To Post
Quote: Talking Horse, Tuesday, 3 Jun 2014 19:02


Surely these gods themselves are possessed of infinite wisdom themselves..... why would they be 'jealous'?



The Greek gods are like watching a soap opera. They may be gods, but they squabble as much as the worst family.
Talking Horse
 10 Jun 2014, 17:19 #180376 Reply To Post
I'm still confident I'll find some expert on these Greek Gods who now am told fought among themselves.
Keep me posted and if anyone's an expert I'll be pleased to hear.

AlyssaRose
 10 Jun 2014, 20:13 #180383 Reply To Post
Hi Ed,
Sorry to hear you haven't got far with your research. I think that's the fun part. Have you tried The Greek Myths by Robert Graves?
Good luck,
Alice
"I'm just going to write because I cannot help it."
- Charlotte Bronte

Straylight
 15 Jun 2014, 10:48 #180586 Reply To Post
Would the Island of the Lotus Eaters be any good for you? A place full of people who do nothing but eat the lotus and are trapped for the rest of their lives unless they break the addiction. Ulysses escapes from it if I remember right.

Are you after a modern character who will simply have resonance with Greek myth (as in Ulysses/Brother Where Art Thou) or an actual mythological figure to re-tell their story?

If modern day metaphor, is there a compelling reason it must be Greek? Buddha or any number of Judeo-Christian prophets and saints could be used instead. You could still have Tantalus as the opposite.

If set in ancient Greece, you could always simply invent a character, possibly with the story including why his name was struck from history!
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