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Pouring and poring.
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sulcus
 28 Jun 2011, 17:56 #121809 Reply To Post
Quote: kazmojazz, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 16:44
Oi! That wasn't me what said that!

Quote: sulcus, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 16:32
Quote: papa stas, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 10:06
Quote: kazmojazz, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 15:45


legitimate way to organise your novel around.

.


*&^%$£@€*/>? formatting
"A,B&E", "Not In My Name" and "52FF" (flash fiction anthology) all available on Amazon Kindle

"How a psychopath makes sweet love. I can get you ringside. Royal box even."
notleyab
 28 Jun 2011, 18:00 #121810 Reply To Post
Quote: Warren Peace, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 16:46
Fowler is good, but his pedantry is almost a cliché in itself.

I like this, by Frank Whitaker quoted by Partridge in Usage and Abusage:

"Haste encourages them, but more often they spring from mental laziness. I have, however, heard their use in football reports defended on the ground that the public expects them, and would be lost without them."



Yes, that's what i was getting at it when i suggested it was written cerca 1066.
i suppose any rulebook has to be pedantic, even more so when it tries to restrict an ever expanding language such as English.
Zuckerberg Shmuckerberg, Starbucks Sucks
sulcus
 28 Jun 2011, 20:00 #121820 Reply To Post
Quote: notleyab, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 18:00
Quote: Warren Peace, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 16:46
Fowler is good, but his pedantry is almost a cliché in itself.

I like this, by Frank Whitaker quoted by Partridge in Usage and Abusage:

"Haste encourages them, but more often they spring from mental laziness. I have, however, heard their use in football reports defended on the ground that the public expects them, and would be lost without them."



Yes, that's what i was getting at it when i suggested it was written cerca 1066.
i suppose any rulebook has to be pedantic, even more so when it tries to restrict an ever expanding language such as English.


I'm not sure it is ever expanding. Despite all the new technology and idiomatic slang, I think we're losing more words than we're gaining.

"A,B&E", "Not In My Name" and "52FF" (flash fiction anthology) all available on Amazon Kindle

"How a psychopath makes sweet love. I can get you ringside. Royal box even."
notleyab
 28 Jun 2011, 20:44 #121826 Reply To Post
Quote: sulcus, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 20:00
Quote: notleyab, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 18:00
Quote: Warren Peace, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 16:46
Fowler is good, but his pedantry is almost a cliché in itself.

I like this, by Frank Whitaker quoted by Partridge in Usage and Abusage:

"Haste encourages them, but more often they spring from mental laziness. I have, however, heard their use in football reports defended on the ground that the public expects them, and would be lost without them."



Yes, that's what i was getting at it when i suggested it was written cerca 1066.
i suppose any rulebook has to be pedantic, even more so when it tries to restrict an ever expanding language such as English.


I'm not sure it is ever expanding. Despite all the new technology and idiomatic slang, I think we're losing more words than we're gaining.



But they're still sitting there in the dictionary for you to pluck them out & amaze us.
Just occurred to me, what you like at Scrabble Marc/Sulcus? Or do you find max 7 letter words too restraining?
Zuckerberg Shmuckerberg, Starbucks Sucks
sulcus
 28 Jun 2011, 20:56 #121829 Reply To Post
Quote: notleyab, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 20:44
Quote: sulcus, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 20:00
Quote: notleyab, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 18:00
Quote: Warren Peace, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 16:46
Fowler is good, but his pedantry is almost a cliché in itself.

I like this, by Frank Whitaker quoted by Partridge in Usage and Abusage:

"Haste encourages them, but more often they spring from mental laziness. I have, however, heard their use in football reports defended on the ground that the public expects them, and would be lost without them."



Yes, that's what i was getting at it when i suggested it was written cerca 1066.
i suppose any rulebook has to be pedantic, even more so when it tries to restrict an ever expanding language such as English.


I'm not sure it is ever expanding. Despite all the new technology and idiomatic slang, I think we're losing more words than we're gaining.



But they're still sitting there in the dictionary for you to pluck them out & amaze us.
Just occurred to me, what you like at Scrabble Marc/Sulcus? Or do you find max 7 letter words too restraining?


I use the Scrabble bag of letters to compose my work
"A,B&E", "Not In My Name" and "52FF" (flash fiction anthology) all available on Amazon Kindle

"How a psychopath makes sweet love. I can get you ringside. Royal box even."
sulcus
 28 Jun 2011, 20:57 #121830 Reply To Post
Quote: notleyab, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 20:44
Quote: sulcus, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 20:00
Quote: notleyab, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 18:00
Quote: Warren Peace, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 16:46
Fowler is good, but his pedantry is almost a cliché in itself.

I like this, by Frank Whitaker quoted by Partridge in Usage and Abusage:

"Haste encourages them, but more often they spring from mental laziness. I have, however, heard their use in football reports defended on the ground that the public expects them, and would be lost without them."



Yes, that's what i was getting at it when i suggested it was written cerca 1066.
i suppose any rulebook has to be pedantic, even more so when it tries to restrict an ever expanding language such as English.


I'm not sure it is ever expanding. Despite all the new technology and idiomatic slang, I think we're losing more words than we're gaining.



But they're still sitting there in the dictionary for you to pluck them out & amaze us.
Just occurred to me, what you like at Scrabble Marc/Sulcus? Or do you find max 7 letter words too restraining?


the problem is when the word has the designation obsolete or archaic Folk don't recognise everyday words like demulcent or disembogue, so what chance these?
"A,B&E", "Not In My Name" and "52FF" (flash fiction anthology) all available on Amazon Kindle

"How a psychopath makes sweet love. I can get you ringside. Royal box even."
papa stas
 28 Jun 2011, 21:03 #121831 Reply To Post
Quote: sulcus, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 20:57

the problem is when the word has the designation obsolete or archaic Folk don't recognise everyday words like demulcent or disembogue, so what chance these?


And therein my, dear sulcus -

lies the dilemma.

Does one write for the masses?

or for oneself -

and a very few others?

papa
stas (chooses the masses - but still likes a good game of scrabble every now and then)

As I have grown older, I've learned that pleasing everyone is impossible, but pissing everyone off is a piece of cake!
sulcus
 28 Jun 2011, 21:12 #121832 Reply To Post
Quote: papa stas, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 21:03
Quote: sulcus, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 20:57

the problem is when the word has the designation obsolete or archaic Folk don't recognise everyday words like demulcent or disembogue, so what chance these?


And therein my, dear sulcus -

lies the dilemma.

Does one write for the masses?

or for oneself -

and a very few others?

papa
stas (chooses the masses - but still likes a good game of scrabble every now and then)



somewhere between the two Stas. Some readers like to be challenged
"A,B&E", "Not In My Name" and "52FF" (flash fiction anthology) all available on Amazon Kindle

"How a psychopath makes sweet love. I can get you ringside. Royal box even."
unclearthur
 28 Jun 2011, 22:39 #121837 Reply To Post
Quote: sulcus, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 21:12
Quote: papa stas, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 21:03
Quote: sulcus, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 20:57

the problem is when the word has the designation obsolete or archaic Folk don't recognise everyday words like demulcent or disembogue, so what chance these?


And therein my, dear sulcus -

lies the dilemma.

Does one write for the masses?

or for oneself -

and a very few others?

papa
stas (chooses the masses - but still likes a good game of scrabble every now and then)



somewhere between the two Stas. Some readers like to be challenged


Nooooo! I hate having to reach for the dictionary right in the middle of a good bit.

Closer to home, I read an extract of Harry Nicholson's Tom Fleck. Good though it was, I found some of the medieval terms frustrating - because I wanted to know what they meant. Without leaving the 'book'.

Are we getting to the point where (horror!) novels should include a glossary? Or am I, like an awful lot of readers, just lazy?

http://cavalrytales.wordpress.com
www.cavalrytales.co.uk

'The battle that never ends is the battle of belief against disbelief'
sulcus
 28 Jun 2011, 23:39 #121841 Reply To Post
Quote: unclearthur, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 22:39
Quote: sulcus, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 21:12
Quote: papa stas, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 21:03
Quote: sulcus, Tuesday, 28 Jun 2011 20:57

the problem is when the word has the designation obsolete or archaic Folk don't recognise everyday words like demulcent or disembogue, so what chance these?


And therein my, dear sulcus -

lies the dilemma.

Does one write for the masses?

or for oneself -

and a very few others?

papa
stas (chooses the masses - but still likes a good game of scrabble every now and then)



somewhere between the two Stas. Some readers like to be challenged


Nooooo! I hate having to reach for the dictionary right in the middle of a good bit.

Closer to home, I read an extract of Harry Nicholson's Tom Fleck. Good though it was, I found some of the medieval terms frustrating - because I wanted to know what they meant. Without leaving the 'book'.

Are we getting to the point where (horror!) novels should include a glossary? Or am I, like an awful lot of readers, just lazy?

http://cavalrytales.wordpress.com


neither, you'd be surprised how close you'd get to the meaning of the word from the context of the sentence.

Being challenged isn't only a question of vocabulary by the way. metaphors, ideas, associations can all reach to take your breath away. That is good writing.
"A,B&E", "Not In My Name" and "52FF" (flash fiction anthology) all available on Amazon Kindle

"How a psychopath makes sweet love. I can get you ringside. Royal box even."
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