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Pouring and poring.
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CaroleH
 27 Jun 2011, 15:10 #121697 Reply To Post
It's one of those silly writing rools, innit? Here are some more:

Tell don’t show

Always use clichés.

Never use a verb unless you can think of at least 3 good adverbs to go with it.

Never use a simple word if you can think of a more complicated one.

Look through the text for –ly words, and add more.

Look through the text and decide if you need more information or background. Insert this in a large chunk, with lots of description.

Look through the text and if the pace is too fast, slow it down.

Settings are best described in the most obscure and poetic way possible. They should provide a real diversion from the text.

perrybond
 27 Jun 2011, 15:15 #121698 Reply To Post
"Poring over a map"
-I just see a group of dogs staring intently at a map.

-The aim is to write something so good, it becomes a cliche.

ps CarolH - have you been reading my book!
This post was last edited by perrybond, 27 Jun 2011, 15:29
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kazmojazz
 27 Jun 2011, 15:22 #121699 Reply To Post
Quote: CaroleH, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 15:10
It's one of those silly writing rools, innit? Here are some more:

Tell don’t show

Always use clichés.

Never use a verb unless you can think of at least 3 good adverbs to go with it.

Never use a simple word if you can think of a more complicated one.

Look through the text for –ly words, and add more.

Look through the text and decide if you need more information or background. Insert this in a large chunk, with lots of description.

Look through the text and if the pace is too fast, slow it down.

Settings are best described in the most obscure and poetic way possible. They should provide a real diversion from the text.



Joe 90
 27 Jun 2011, 15:30 #121701 Reply To Post
Quote: Amber Fox, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 14:41
I've got a nasty feeling Joe is right. And why use a cliche when you can 'study' or 'look at' a map? Say it like it is.


That makes me feel good.
my website
kazmojazz
 27 Jun 2011, 15:35 #121703 Reply To Post
Quote: Joe 90, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 15:30
Quote: Amber Fox, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 14:41
I've got a nasty feeling Joe is right. And why use a cliche when you can 'study' or 'look at' a map? Say it like it is.


That makes me feel good.


Yes but, Joe, why is 'to pore' a cliche, when 'to look' isn't?That's what I don't understand. I know I'm probably being immensely dim but it doesn't make sense to me.
Joe 90
 27 Jun 2011, 15:37 #121704 Reply To Post
Quote: RoseRed, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 13:16
Quote: Joe 90, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 13:10
Quote: Amber Fox, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 10:40
Should my hero 'pore' over a map, or 'pour' over a map? Both look ridiculous. Which is correct?


Neither. They're cliches.


Being a cliché doesn't make it incorrect, just a little lazy. While we're on the subject, clichés are fine if they're part of dialogue, with the possible exception of the speaking character's being an English language academic or a writer of heavy literature. It sounds odd when quite ordinary people suddenly appear to have highfalutin powers of description.



Perhaps for cliché, read 'hackneyed.'

'He pored over the map.'

or

The map crackled, like starched linen as he stretched it out; tiny roads, buildings, steep contour lines wearying the laden traveller or urging the cyclist, hunched over his handlebars to get off and push. From his god's eye view, all the region rolled away under his god-like fingertips; here a farm, there a main road where a milk-tanker rolled over into a pond....

Let the words speak. Far more fun.
my website
kazmojazz
 27 Jun 2011, 15:45 #121705 Reply To Post
Just realised I'm sounding like a three-year-old with all my whys. Hackneyed, I get. Thank you.

MJ26
 27 Jun 2011, 15:46 #121706 Reply To Post
For a good definition of clichés and hackneyed words and phrases and battered ornaments etc, see Fowler's Modern English Usage - it's all good, and interesting, stuff.
AFTER GOYA
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kazmojazz
 27 Jun 2011, 16:02 #121707 Reply To Post
Quote: MJ26, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 15:46
For a good definition of clichés and hackneyed words and phrases and battered ornaments etc, see Fowler's Modern English Usage - it's all good, and interesting, stuff.


Just ordered it from Amazon. Maybe now I'll stop asking awkward questions - and stop using cliches, too. Bingo!
notleyab
 27 Jun 2011, 22:48 #121748 Reply To Post
Quote: perrybond, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 15:15
"Poring over a map"
-I just see a group of dogs staring intently at a map.

-The aim is to write something so good, it becomes a cliche.

ps CarolH - have you been reading my book!


No, no, that wd be PAWING over a map.
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