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YouWriteOn Message Board > Literary Forums > It Was A Dark And Stormy Night... Help Search Recent Posts
Pouring and poring.
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Amber Fox
 27 Jun 2011, 10:40 #121668 Reply To Post
Should my hero 'pore' over a map, or 'pour' over a map? Both look ridiculous. Which is correct?
kazmojazz
 27 Jun 2011, 10:44 #121669 Reply To Post
Pore, definitely, unless he's a paticularly wet sort of drip.
Joe 90
 27 Jun 2011, 13:10 #121678 Reply To Post
Quote: Amber Fox, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 10:40
Should my hero 'pore' over a map, or 'pour' over a map? Both look ridiculous. Which is correct?


Neither. They're cliches.
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RoseRed
 27 Jun 2011, 13:16 #121679 Reply To Post
Quote: Joe 90, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 13:10
Quote: Amber Fox, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 10:40
Should my hero 'pore' over a map, or 'pour' over a map? Both look ridiculous. Which is correct?


Neither. They're cliches.


Being a cliché doesn't make it incorrect, just a little lazy. While we're on the subject, clichés are fine if they're part of dialogue, with the possible exception of the speaking character's being an English language academic or a writer of heavy literature. It sounds odd when quite ordinary people suddenly appear to have highfalutin powers of description.

RobertB
 27 Jun 2011, 13:47 #121684 Reply To Post
People tend to speak in cliches; sometimes you come across someone who responds to everything with a cliche. There's a place for them.

You pore over something with your eyes; you pour a substance over it.
kazmojazz
 27 Jun 2011, 13:56 #121685 Reply To Post
Quote: Joe 90, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 13:10
Quote: Amber Fox, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 10:40
Should my hero 'pore' over a map, or 'pour' over a map? Both look ridiculous. Which is correct?


Neither. They're cliches.


Joe, I've heard a lot about cliches since I've been on this site. Can you please tell me why 'poring over a map' is a cliche, when 'looking at a map' or 'studying a map' isn't? Or are they all cliches? Or should we just stop looking at blinking maps?
Amber Fox
 27 Jun 2011, 14:41 #121692 Reply To Post
I've got a nasty feeling Joe is right. And why use a cliche when you can 'study' or 'look at' a map? Say it like it is.
kazmojazz
 27 Jun 2011, 14:49 #121693 Reply To Post
Quote: Amber Fox, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 14:41
I've got a nasty feeling Joe is right. And why use a cliche when you can 'study' or 'look at' a map? Say it like it is.


Yes, but WHY is it a cliche, when to pore means 'to study with steady, continued attention and application'? Surely, the word is perfect for the situation. 'Look at' doesn't mean the same thing. To pore is a verb. Why the hell can we use some and not others? PLEASE someone explain.
MJ26
 27 Jun 2011, 14:58 #121694 Reply To Post
"blinking map" - that's not a cliché - reads like a description of a dodgy GPS.
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Xean
 27 Jun 2011, 15:02 #121696 Reply To Post
Quote: Amber Fox, Monday, 27 Jun 2011 14:41
Pore or pour? ...why use a cliche when you can 'study' or 'look at' a map?


Quote: kazmojazz

Yes, but WHY is it a cliche, when to pore means 'to study with steady, continued attention and application'? Surely, the word is perfect for the situation. 'Look at' doesn't mean the same thing. To pore is a verb. Why the hell can we use some and not others? PLEASE someone explain.



A cliche' is an expression or phrase that people tend to connect with and overuse. In using it often, the true meaning gets lost and so the word or phrase no longer has the relevance it once did and that's when it becomes cliched.

Pore may seem like one of those because many have been using it in past (though yours is the first use I've encountered recently). Why people liked it? It combines the meaning of both studying and looking and adds feeling. Poring over something means you are looking or studying it attentively; which means you're describing not just what they're doing, but how they are doing it.

Pour has a completely different meaning and I don't believe bears any relevance in what you're trying to accomplish... unless you are ripping the map and pouring the pieces into a shredder.

Hope this helps.


This post was last edited by Xean, 27 Jun 2011, 15:17

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